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Welcome to West Dunbartonshire Libraries Book Week Scotland 2016 Events

Book Week Scotland is a week-long celebration of books and reading that is taking place this year from Monday 21 – Friday 25 November and West Dunbartonshire Libraries have an excellent line up of literary talent for you to enjoy.

During Book Week, people of all ages and walks of life will come together in libraries, schools, community venues and workplaces to share and enjoy books and reading. 

West Dunbartonshire Libraries have an exciting line-up for this year’s Book Week Scotland. We have a short-listed Man Booker Prize 2016 author, Graeme Macrae Burnet and Jackie Copleton who was a Richard and Judy Book Club pick this summer.  We also have a fantastic Crime Panel event featuring authors published by Faber which includes Doug Johnstone. 

Richard Holloway

Image of Richard Holloway
Richard Holloway

Richard Holloway will be discussing his new book, A Little History of Religion,which is a rich and colourful history of religion from humanity’s earliest days to our own contentious times. In an era of hardening religious attitudes and explosive religious violence, this book offers a welcome antidote. Richard Holloway retells the entire history of religion - from the dawn of religious belief to the twenty-first century with deepest respect and a keen commitment to accuracy.

Writing for those with faith and those without, and especially for young readers who might be making their minds up, he encourages curiosity and tolerance, accentuates nuance and mystery, and calmly restores a sense of the value of faith. Ranging far beyond the major world religions of Judaism, Islam, Christianity, Buddhism and Hinduism, the author also examines where religious belief comes from, the search for meaning throughout history, today’s fascinations with Scientology and Creationism, religiously motivated violence, hostilities between religious people and secularists, and more. Holloway proves an empathic yet discerning guide to the enduring significance of faith and its power from ancient times to our own. Richard Holloway, former Bishop of Edinburgh and Primus of the Scottish Episcopal Church, is an internationally popular writer and broadcaster.

Richard will be in conversation with Donny O’Rourke about his new book at Dalmuir Library on Thursday the 17th of November at 7.30 pm

Jack O’Donnell

Jack O'Donnell
Jack O'Donnell

Lily Poole is Jack O’Donnell’s debut novel.  Jack is from Dalmuir and has had a variety of jobs.  He got into writing when he completed an Open University creative writing course in 2008.  Lily Poole was the first crowd-funded book in Scotland and has received rave reviews on Amazon.  It’s set in Clydebank in the 1970’s and follows John’s story.  John helps a wee girl, Lily, get to school on time.  She waits for him to meet her outside the school gates every day, but he seems to be the only one who can see her. This provokes a backlash that ripples out from concerned mothers at school to the parish priest of St Stephen’s and invites institutional responses that involve the police and psychiatric care. 

As Jack himself, says, “Well, Lily Poole is a page turner, so in a way it’s a thriller, but it’s also a coming-of-age story and a ghost story without a ghost. It’s grounded in the world and institutions of working-class Scotland and, in particular, a psychiatric ward in Gartnavel Hospital. It’s a love story, where love really does hurt.”

Come and meet Jack and hear him talk about his amazing debut.

Jack will be in conversation with Donny O’Rourke about his new book 'Lily Poole' at Dalmuir Library on Saturday the 19th of Nov at 11.30 am.

Graeme Macrae Burnet

Graeme mcrae burnet.
Graeme Mcrae Burnet

Graeme Macrae Burnet’s second novel, His Bloody Project, is short-listed for the Man Booker prize. It has received huge critical acclaim. It explores what drove a young man by the name of Roderick Macrae to commit a brutal triple murder in a remote community in the Highlands. It is clear from a memoir that the accused has written that he is guilty, but can his advocate same him from the gallows? The Guardian describes His Bloody Project as being 'A fiendishly readable tale that richly deserves the wider attention the Booker has brought it.' Don’t miss this opportunity to see one of Scotland’s finest new literary talents. 

Graeme will be at Duntocher Library at 7.30 pm on Monday 21 November.

 

Faber Crime Panel

Faber Crime Panel.
Top: Doug Johnstone;Middle: Rod Reynolds;Bottom: Sarah Ward

Join us for a superb line-up of leading crime writers - Doug JohnstoneRod Reynolds; Sarah Ward.

Doug Johnstone is a perennial favourite at West Dunbartonshire - his novel Jump was recently shortlisted for the Scottish Crime Book of the Year. His latest, Crash Land, is an Orkney-based psychological thriller steeped in guilt, shame, lust, deception and murder.

Rod Reynolds' exceptional second novel Black Night Falling displays the feel for place, period and atmosphere which marked out his acclaimed debut, The Dark Inside. Come and along and experience an afternoon of the finest contemporary crime fiction and meet three of the best exponents of the craft. 

Sarah has written two novels set in the Peak District. Her debut novel, In Bitter Chill, was described by the Daily Mail as a ‘tense, well-told story of loss and family secrets’. Her second book, A Deadly Thaw, was described as being ‘relentless in its grip’ by the Financial Times.

This event is at Dumbarton Library at 1.00 pm on Tuesday 22 November.

 

Jackie Copleton

Jackie Copleton
Jackie Copleton

Jackie Copleton’s novel, A Dictionary of Mutual Understanding, has made an impressive impact for the debut novelist. Jackie, a former journalist, was inspired to write the novel by her time living in Nagasaki in the 1990’s. As well as being a Richard and Judy book club pick for summer 2016, it was long-listed for the Baileys Women's Prize for Fiction 2016. Amaterasu Takahashi has spent her life grieving for her daughter Yuko and grandson Hideo, who were victims of the atomic bomb dropped on Nagasaki in 1945. When a man claiming to be Hideo arrives on her doorstep, she is forced to revisit the past; the hurt and humiliation of her early life, the intoxication of a first romance and the realisation that if she had loved her daughter in a different way, she might still be alive today. Join us for a fascinating exploration of the legacy of war and meet one of the rising stars of contemporary fiction

Jackie will be at Parkhall Library on Tuesday 22 November at 7.30 pm

 

Rose T Clark

This event has now been cancelled due to unforeseen circumstances. 

Rose.T.Clark
Rose T Clark

'I'm Rose. John and I shared nearly eight years of our lives together. This is our story: a story of how two ordinary people live with the diagnosis, the check-ups, the disappointments, the relief, the questions, the answers, the operations, the recovery, the emergencies, the denial, the acceptance, the anger, the pain, the loss, the love, the fear, the frustration - and the happiness.'  Join Rose T Clark in an exploration of love and loss and discover how the human spirit can transcend even the hardest and darkest of challenges.  Philip Larkin said ‘What will survive of us is love’ and Rose’s book Cellmates profoundly embodies this.  Rose is very keen to raise far wider awareness of the professional support that is required for carers, as well as patients, and she will share some of the practical things that helped her partner and her. It will especially be of interest to healthcare professionals and carers. This special event has been very kindly provided and sponsored by Macmillan Cancer Support. 

 "Beautifully written… an outstanding read for all health care professionals... profound, honest, a love story, a journey through cancer, compellingly told." - Professor Marie Fallon, Chair of Palliative Medicine, University of Edinburgh.

 "Any reader opening [this book] will be taken to the heart of John and Rose's relationship and the gruelling experience they shared of John's cancer. It is a beautifully written testimony to the human spirit when stretched to its limits." Dr Elspeth Salter, Centre Head, Maggie's Cancer Caring Centre

 PLEASE NOTE: Parts of this account may be distressing for some audience members and may not be appropriate for your stage of a cancer (or carer's) journey, especially for those recently diagnosed.

 

 

Rupert Wolfe Murray
Rupert Wolfe Murray

Rupert Wolfe Murray

Nine Months in Tibet is about overcoming the fear of travelling alone, getting a job in Lhasa, riding a horse through Eastern Tibet, falling in love with Italian women, witnessing a violent protest between Buddhist monks and the Chinese police and getting expelled from the country for not helping the police with their enquiries.

Boys on Roof of Jokhang Temple Lhasa Tibet 1987 by Ulrike Zimmermann
Jokhang Temple Tibet 1987 by Ulrike Zimmermann

Join travel writer and blogger Rupert Wolfe Murray as he explores the nine months he spent in Tibet and he will tell you how you can also overcome your fears and anxieties and travel independently and have your own adventures. 

You can hear Rupert at Balloch Library on Wednesday 23 Nov at 7.30 pm.

 

Callum Christie

Callum Christie
Callum Christie

Callum Christie has a fascinating story to tell about the last days of Barotseland, an African kingdom which was a British protectorate for over 70 years.  The rulers of Barotseland, in the remote west of Northern Rhodesia (now Zambia), had little idea of the political tsunami that was about to engulf them. Elsewhere in the country a growing nationalist movement was soon to take power from the British Government and the white settlers, and consequently from the traditional rulers of Barotseland.

Indunas being taken across a flooded valley
Indunas being taken across a flooded valley

Callum Christie, posted to Barotseland fresh from university in 1959 tells the story, and much besides, through his letters home to family and friends.  This talk will be illustrated with a stunning series of images. 

Callum will be talking at Clydebank Library’s Heritage Centre at 2.00 pm Thursday 24 November.

 

Malachy Tallack

Malachy Tallack
Malachy Tallack

Come and explore ‘The Un-discovered Islands’ with critically acclaimed author Malachy Tallack. The Un-Discovered Islands is an exploration of some of the world’s strangest places.   We will discover two dozen islands once believed to be real but which are no longer on the map. These are the products of imagination, deception and human error. You will journey from the legendary island of Atlantis, right through ancient history and up to the present day exploring places discovered and then un-discovered.  Embark upon a sea voyage through an archipelago of myths, mysteries, phantoms and fakes.

Malachy Tallack is from Shetland, but he now lives in Glasgow. His first book, Sixty Degrees North, was a BBC Book of the Week in 2015. As a singer-songwriter he has released four albums. 

Malachy will be in Alexandria Library on Thursday 24 November at 7.30 pm.

 

Donny O’Rourke

Donny O'Rourke
Donny O'Rourke

Donny O’Rourke’s' poems, songs, stories and stand-up routines have been praised by critics for their warmth, wisdom and wit; qualities audiences have admired at home and overseas. Every word can be understood by anybody; and yet Donny's work is widely taught in schools and universities. This 'heart to heart' communicator is a born bard and 'urban seannachie', a cultural activist who speaks for, from and to the working class in which he grew up but whose performances draw on his education at the Universities of Glasgow and Cambridge. Beguiling charm, razor sharp satire, instant intimacy and a joyous, generosity of spirit- these are the trademarks of a writer, film-maker, broadcaster and journalist with more than a score of books and CDS to his name as well as several awards, fellowships, residencies, prizes and professorships.  Donny is currently in the latter stages of a 9 month Scottish Book Trust Reading Champion residency in Dalmuir Library. 

You can see Donny at Dalmuir Library on Friday 25 November at 7.30 pm.